Atlanta Heritage Owner-Occupied Rehab Program

Lance Orchid from Councilmember Jennifer Ide’s office met with the Program Managers for Districts 6 (ours) & 2 today where they said they have set up time for them to speak to any potential applicants next week on March 26 at the Ponce Library from 11:30 AM until 4:00 PM. They will be there again on the 27th but we don’t yet know the hours.

They told us that they would be willing to go to people’s houses directly as well.

If anyone feels that there are streets they should canvass, please let me know what they are and I can make sure they do that too.

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Looking for an Article Seen in the VOICE?

Check the Archive!

Publishing of articles from the VOICE on the website news feed has been temporarily suspended. However, you can find the current and all back issues of the VOICE in the archive located here.

As mentioned in the last issue of the VOICE, we are looking for some help with the newsletter and website. If you are interested, please send a message to communications@vahi.org.

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Take the Survey

The Virginia-Highland Civic Association organizes two main events each year, Summerfest and the Tour of Homes. These events earn revenue to fund many of neighborhood initiatives. In addition, we organize other social and fund-raising events for specific purposes such as fund-raisers for Fire Station #19.

Recently we have formed a committee to look at adding one or more events during the year – either as fund-raisers or as purely community building activities. This survey is designed to solicit your feedback on the types of events that are most interesting to you. Please follow the link to take the three-question survey

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I-85 Small Business Resource Event

Join Invest Atlanta and partners to learn about the resources available to businesses impacted by the I-85 closure. This is an opportunity to meet with local service providers offering technical assistance, financing, consulting services, and more.

Tuesday May 9th 10:00 – 2:00 PM

Peachtree Hills Recreation Center, Peachtree Hills Avenue NE, Atlanta GA

Find additional information here:

Invest Atlanta Webpage

BIS Now Article

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Happening in VaHi: A Book Signing by Local Authors

 

Join Joyce DeWitt and Kathy Knapp on Sunday May 7 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. as they read from and sign their new children’s book, The Story of Leo and Emma. The story tells of a 7-year old girl and her next-door neighbor, an eleven-year-old basset hound. Their friendship blooms as they learn about accepting those who are different from you.

This delightful story was inspired by a real neighborhood girl and her next-door neighbor. Stop by Paper Source on Sunday, and in addition to a signed copy of the book, you can get the “paw-tograph” of Leo!

When: Sun, May 7, 3:30 PM – 5:30 PM

Where: Paper Source 1052 North Highland Avenue Northeast, Atlanta, GA 30306

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What the Inman Middle School Crossing Guard Saw

We regret that the original version of this article had a racially-offensive characterization. This in no way represents the values that we aspire to in this community or association.

One of the many things that makes Virginia-Highland great is our diversity. We celebrate that diversity and want everyone to feel welcome in our neighborhood and valued by the civic association.

It takes just one time…

Wed March 29, 2017

Inman Middle School has four morning crossing guard posts in the morning, two staffed by APS employees and two by neighborhood volunteers. One volunteer position is on the corner in front of the Field of Dreams; the other at the Clemont-Cooledge crossing.

There have been days when the Field of Dreams position has been unguarded because there simply are not enough volunteers. It’s usually the last one filled. Still, there is a light there to get kids across—it’s not as terrifying as crossing Virginia right in front of the school, where there are buses stopped, and westbound cars coming down Virginia turning right onto Park, and eastbound cars turning left on to Ponce de Leon Place, and stopped traffic obscuring views.

Sometimes I have worked the Field of Dreams position thinking how quiet it was for the most part.

But not today.

This morning I responded to a last-minute call to staff the Field of Dreams position and I am so glad I did because of what I helped prevent.

A freak situation

The sun was really bright this morning, and it had risen pretty much to eye level, so that cars and pedestrians heading east on Virginia could hardly see anything. In fact, one student I escorted across Ponce de Leon Place toward the church crossing screwed up her eyes so tightly they were barely open.

At the height of the morning arrival to the school, a fire truck suddenly roared up Virginia from the west, sirens blaring. I made sure the children did not attempt to cross Ponce De Leon Terrace (especially since the pedestrian light was red anyway!). As the fire truck sped up Virginia past the school, its siren still blaring, the pedestrian light changed. Presumably safe now to cross, on multiple counts.

Not so.

No one heard another, smaller emergency vehicle racing up Virginia, its siren blending in with the one that had just passed. The children, and the drivers coming  up Virginia, were all blinded by the sun. As the children started to step into the crosswalk, I gave one last glance down Virginia, just in time to see the second emergency vehicle, which was going very fast, start to turn right onto Ponce de Leon Terrace, its siren drowned by that of the receding fire truck. I urgently blocked the children’s path until the vehicle had turned. All happened in just seconds.

What if I had not been there? The children could not see properly. The pedestrian light was green. The emergency vehicle barely slowed down to turn right, if at all. I think it would have been a disaster.

I have seen children crossing there in the morning when there was no guard—I can see down there when I am standing at Clemont. It always looks quite routine.

It just takes one freak situation. Or one irresponsible driver coming through at just the wrong time.

How to volunteer
If you would like to help out as a crossing guard, email transportation@inmanmiddleschool.org. They really need more. You can do it as often or as seldom as you like. You simply sign up for a morning any time you feel like it.  Each morning shift is from 8:30 – 9:05. Some do it once a month, others 2 or 3 times a week. It’s up to you.

Charming sights

The children can be quite charming. There was one boy this morning who came up the Virginia sidewalk from the west on his skateboard. A very colorful skateboard, indeed. He clearly loves it. He told me that he skates all the way along the BeltLine from Irwin Street.

And there are cyclists. And musicians carrying their instruments. And children carrying in phantasmographic artwork and outlandish cutouts.

It’s fun being a crossing guard, and it’s important.
For more information: http://inmanmiddleschool.org/crosswalk-parents/.

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Park Pride Hosts Annual “Pints for Parks” on May 2


David Brandenberger, VHCA Board Member and Parks Committee Chair

Longtime metro Atlanta parks advocates Park Pride will hold their annual spring social and fundraiser Tuesday, May 2nd from 6 PM to 9 PM. This year’s event brings together park (and beer!) enthusiasts at Orpheus Brewing for an evening of drinks, games and good company, all in the spirit of celebrating green space.

Your $45 ticketed donation will include a limited edition Park Pride tasting glass, seven complimentary beer tastings, food, a brewery tour, an opportunity to participate in a silent auction, and the ability to participate in several games. In addition to a enjoying a fun evening, you will be supporting an organization that works tirelessly to preserve, maintain and build parks and green spaces in the City of Atlanta, creating a more sustainable, equitable, ecologically-stable and beautiful city to live in. Park Pride specifically has made multiple generous grants to every one of Virginia-Highland’s parks over many years.

They are expecting around 350 attendees at this year’s Pints for Parks, so register early. For more information, click here.

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Inman Middle School Jazz Band Gives Visitors an Unexpected Treat

 

Visitors to the Inman lobby were given a treat early on Friday, March 31, when they were unexpectedly arrested by a glorious sound that filled the whole area. It was a pop-up concert by the Inman Middle Jazz Band.

The sound was astonishing. Was it the skill of the young players, the irresistible cascading score, the last day of school, or the beautiful spring day that raised those children to such heights? Maybe all of those. The surprisingly polished sound from players so young was truly a treat. And there was so much joy and enthusiasm coming from the ensemble.

What they were playing was a piece called “Cold Duck Time” by Eddie Harris. The crescendo toward its grand conclusion was lots of fun—reminded me, in a way, of the ending of Ravel’s Bolero in the way it built and hypnotized its way to the end.

Inman Middle Band Director Arneesa Woods (pictured) is clearly an inspiration to those musicians. You could see it in the way she conducted and the way in which they responded.

She told me afterwards that she has been Inman band director for 16 years. She obviously loves it, and she even had a former student, now an adult, assisting her today.

And why the pop-up concert? They are preparing for their spring concert at Grady, and to build confidence under a little more pressure, Arneesa decided they should play in the open lobby for anyone who walked by. They clearly rose to the occasion. So glad I stumbled into it.

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Tips from a New VaHi Business Owner for Building Spring Fitness

By Collin Eggebrecht, owner of OnePoint Physical Therapy

Virginia-Highland continues to be one of the busiest neighborhoods in Atlanta when it comes to outdoor activities.  With endless sidewalks, foot and bike accessible restaurants and shops, numerous beltline entrances and parks, physical activity is a part of life in the neighborhood.

Spring is here, and with that comes increased opportunity for outdoor activity. We are most sedentary in the winter months while spring brings more frequent neighborhood walks, runs and sports participation. Many of us, however, forget to prepare, leading to unwanted injuries, so now is a great time to prepare to prevent them.

How to build strength and endurance

A simple way I like to teach individuals to build their strength and endurance is the 10% rule.  Add 10% of volume per week to your routine to safely progress and to minimize your risk for injury.  This is especially true this time of year as many of us have had limited physical activity over the past few months. The 10% rule is commonly used by runners to safely add miles week over week.  We are not all runners, though, so why not apply this rule to other activities?  All you need to do is pick a measurable aspect of your workout (for example. distance, time, repetitions, and weight).

Here are three examples of ways you can use this principle with your workout routine.

1. Goal: 30 minutes of walking, 3 times per week (90 total minutes)

  • Week 1: 10 minutes of walking, 3 times (30 total minutes)
  • Week 2: 11 minutes of walking, 3 times (33 total minutes)
  • Week 3: 12 minutes of walking, 3 times (36 total minutes)

2. Goal: Lift 20 lbs for 30 repetitions

  • Week 1: Lift 10 lbs for 30 repetitions
  • Week 2: Lift 11 lbs for 30 repetitions
  • Week 3: Lift 12 lbs for 30 repetitions

Reaching out to local businesses for help

Virginia-Highland also houses many fitness instructors and therapists, so if you need assistance, now is a good time to reach out for support. Look around local businesses and gyms or ask your neighbor for a recommendation. Good l
uck, stay hydrated, and keep moving.

Collin Eggebrecht is a new business owner in the Virginia Highland neighborhood. He recently opened the doors to OnePoint Physical Therapy on the corner of Barnett and Greenwood. He has years of experience in injury prevention, sports-related rehabilitation and orthopedics. For more information visit www.onepointpt.com

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How Money Raised by VHCA Helps Support Our Community

VHCA supports our community in many ways, partly through volunteering and partly through financial support.

Following is an overview of the events that bring in the money to support the community and where that money goes.

How we raise the money
Quite simply, the June Summerfest and the December Tour of Homes generate almost all of the funds that we raise.

Since 2005, we have funded over $245,000 in grants for education, partnering nonprofits and community organizations. This includes almost $115,000 in grants to our neighborhood schools, just under $40,000 to our public library, and over $35,000 to Trees Atlanta.

Our funding also supports other neighborhood projects, including the acquisition of N Highland Park, park improvements, safety, sidewalk and traffic concerns, planning and preservation efforts, and communication.

Some specific allocations
Here are just some of the funds that the civic association allocated in 2016:

VHCA Grant Awards – 2016

  • $19.500 to install three APD video cameras, in response to an offer of matching funds from Alex Wan’s council fund.
  • $4000 to Trees Atlanta
  • $3250 to Springdale Elementary PTO
  • $3100 to Inman Middle School
  • $2825 to Ponce de Leon Library
  • $2500 to Inman Middle School Technology Foundation
  • $1750 to Grady High School College and Career Center
  • $1500 Grady Athletic Boosters
  • $1500 to the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition

Volunteering

We are able to raise that money through the efforts of our volunteers. Without them, these initiatives would collapse. So please volunteer for our upcoming Summerfest 2017 in June, as explained in the accompanying article, and know how much you are helping all of us when you do that—not to mention the enjoyment and neighborhood camaraderie you will get out of it.

Remember, without our volunteers, Summerfest simply could not happen.

Thank you for your support, and enjoy Summerfest.

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Welcome to Our Newest Store, Vernacular

by Kay Stephenson, VHCA Vice President

In language, vernacular means “spoken as one’s mother tongue”. In architecture, it means “concerned with domestic and functional rather than monumental buildings”. For Chelsea and Kris, owners of the newest shop in the neighborhood, the name is synonymous with “east coast casual with a west coast vibe”.

The shop, which hosted its grand opening over the weekend, offers mostly casual women’s apparel and accessories, with a curated mix of gifts and home décor items as well. It also offers functional items that are different and fun – like the copper-accented french press for your coffee.

When Chelsea and Kris saw that Stanton Home Furnishings was moving out, they jumped at the chance to open a shop in this vibrant section of Virginia-Highland. A short two months later, and they are open for business at 1044 N. Highland Ave. Monday – Thursday 11 – 7, Friday and Saturday 11 – 8, and Sunday 11 – 6.

Kris said he asked property owner Stuart Meddin about the other open spaces in the strip (Dakota J’s former space and the recently vacant Half-Moon store) but both were already spoken for. No hints though. We will just have to wait and see what pops up.

Chelsea said they don’t have a specific target demographic, and I saw all ages in the shop – they have something for everyone, and at prices that don’t break the bank. They even offer the couple-friendly partner couch, which is nice for an after-brunch catch-up on email while others shop.

Stop in to Vernacular soon and welcome Chelsea & Kris, along with Carol, their full-time store manager, and Miah, the assistant manager. We couldn’t be happier to have them in the neighborhood, and I didn’t make it out of the store without a purchase!

Lovely things from truly nice people.

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Major Changes on the Way for Grady Cluster

David T Howard School Opening in July, 2020 to replace Inman Middle School; many other cluster changes coming, too, including new athletic complex

By Matt Westmoreland, District 3 Representative, Atlanta Board of Education

Last month, APS Superintendent Meria Carstarphen met with the Grady Cluster to update the community about the district’s plans to address capacity challenges within the cluster.

Over the next five years, the Grady Cluster will see $113 million capital investment from the school system— a $52 million renovation and addition at the David T. Howard building to become the cluster’s new middle school, a $33 million renovation and addition at Grady High, an $8 million investment for additional field space, and a $20 million renovation of Morningside Elementary.

New athletic complex
In addition, a sorely needed new athletic complex will provide practice fields primarily for Inman and Grady. Design for that project started in January 2017 and will finish in June 2017. Field construction will be from October 2017 to June 2018.

There will be an interchangeable softball/baseball field, a football/lacrosse/soccer field, locker rooms, public bathrooms, a concession stand, and a parking lot. Inman and Grady will always have first priority. After that, it would be open to other APS schools.

Funding
All of the projects above will be funded through the next Education Special Purpose Local Options Sales Tax, which will start in July 2017. Once that funding was secured through a vote by Atlanta residents last summer, the school system was able to move forward with its various planning processes.

Transformation of Howard
The district has initiated “pre-design activities” at the Howard site on John Wesley Dobbs Ave to prepare for the design phase. APS initiated a site survey and environmental assessment and began removing hazardous materials from the site. At the same time, the district has been working to select an architect for the project and has identified Stevens & Wilkinson/Lord Aeck Sargent with whom to execute a design contract. Under current plans, construction is scheduled to start in August 2018 and be completed by July 2020. Once completed, the building will have a capacity of 1,450. Current Inman enrollment sits just below 1,100.

Renovations at Grady High School
While work is taking place at Howard, the Grady campus will also undergo an $11 million renovation and see the construction of a new $22 million wing that will include 18 classrooms, 3 science labs, and a new administrative suite.  The expected completion date is July 2021

Temporary relocation of Morningside Elementary School
After the middle school moves to Howard in July 2020, Inman will house Morningside Elementary during that building’s two-year renovation. During that time period, the district will help lead a conversation within the cluster about how best to use the Inman building for additional elementary capacity.

Groups spearheading the changes
As with all projects, a design committee – composed of the school principal, architect, PTA representative, GO Team representative, faculty representative, school board representative, community member, and other district staff – will be commissioned for the Howard, Grady, and Morningside projects.

For more information
Visit http://www.atlantapublicschools.us/schoolchanges and click “Grady Cluster”. Or feel free to e-mail me at mwestmoreland@atlanta.k12.ga.us or call at 404.408.0980

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Police Reveal Cool Camera Features at VHCA Safety Meeting

And body cameras modify behavior on both sides of the lens

On Saturday, March 4th at Church of Our Saviour, a good turnout of VaHi safety captains and other interested residents gathered for the annual Safety Captains’ meeting. In attendance were police experts to explain how they are using cameras to fight crime. There was also a discussion led by the VHCA Safety Committee about what residents and businesses can do within our neighborhood to reduce crime.

Street Cameras and Tag Readers

There are now 9 street cameras installed in VaHi, including 3 purchased by VHCA with financial support from Alex Wan. These cameras are the ones that show the blue lights, and they run all the time. There is also a plan to have cameras and lighting all up and down the Beltline.

The Police Foundation’s Video Integration Center has computer monitors that pull up streaming video from street cameras. The purpose is to support first responders and investigations. When there is a 911 call, the 4 closest street cameras are instantly activated. Two can be rewound 5 minutes to help begin an investigation. The real-time ones show what is happening right now—for example, a victim on the ground.

The Atlanta Police Foundation’s Video Integration Center

There are also 200 tag readers city-wide. They ping if a suspect car passes them, so police can head over there. These have been very successful and are pretty cool: they snap pictures of tags, transform them to data, upload them to the cloud, and check to see if the owner is wanted. According to the police experts in attendance, there has been a 40% reduction in crime where cameras and tag readers are installed. Blue lights and signs serve to warn would-be criminals that they are under surveillance.

Business and resident cameras

In addition to using the police street cameras, the police Video Integration Center (VIC) can take advantage of business cameras if they are integrated into the system. (This has already happened at Lenox Mall.) Therefore:

  • VHCA plans to do a survey of all businesses in the neighborhood to see who has cameras, and what type, to see if they are compatible with the VIC. If not compatible with the VIC, they would be eligible for our registry (see below).
  • We will also reach out to residents to see if they are willing to identify theirs—those would not be integrated because of privacy and because home cameras have lower quality than police cameras. But they could be a useful resource, and in some cases already have been.
  • Accordingly, VHCA has started a registry (both residential and business) of who already has cameras in the neighborhood. This is a voluntary program: You are not obligated to turn video to police. But they may contact you using the registry if there is an incident near your location.

Anyone interested in helping with this project, or who has a camera, can get in touch with Safety Committee Members Kay Stephenson and Eleanor Barrineau by emailing safety@vahi.org.

Body Cameras

Officer Joseph Mercado of the APD gave a demo of police body cameras

Officer Joseph Mercado of the APD led a discussion and demo of police body cameras, which have now been rolled out in Zone 6. Body cams not only provide transparency, but they serve as a behavior modifier for both ends. Police are able to see how they interact with the public and learn how they could have interacted differently. Also when a person realizes they’re being recorded, it tends to improve the tone of that person when talking to the police.

Zone 6 has had their cameras since the beginning of January. By summer, all officers who answer 911 calls will have body cameras. Officers wear them their entire shift and if they are working off duty (like FBAC) they wear them then as well.

How the body cam video is used. If there is an incident, officers can later enter information into the recording about the incident, which goes into a database that can be part of a wider query later. The hope is to get better prosecution. Video can show the judge that the person has done something multiple times. The judge can see the actual video, not just a report, and this has more impact. Footage cannot be deleted by the officer. The recordings are also encrypted—they only work on supervisors’ docks. So no one can download to their computer. There is an automatic audit trail of who viewed a video and that audit trail can’t be deleted.

A body cam records exactly what the officer sees, so his perspective is what can be demonstrated. If the officer is looking into headlight glare, then that’s what the camera sees, too. There are no filters, by design. It’s a critical part of fairness to show exactly what the officer was seeing. Officers have guidelines on when to turn the body cam on. When an officer activates a body cam, it automatically includes the prior 30 seconds in the recording. In addition, the Police Foundation is currently working with the manufacturer to possibly create a trigger—for example, turning on the police car blue lights could automatically start the camera.

Safety Committee Tips

In the second part of the meeting, the VHCA Safety Chair Eleanor Barrineau led a discussion on Safety Committee Initiatives that we want all residents to be aware of:

1. Lighting.  We want to be sure that bikers, pedestrians and people getting in and out of cars are safe. So we are looking to improve lighting in dark areas. On your own street, keep porch lights on. We recommend dusk-to-dawn light bulbs (Home Depot has them—they look like regular light bulbs and screw into a regular light fixture, but they automatically come on at dusk and off at dawn. No timers, no special wiring!).  We also encourage you to have driveway lights.

2. Graffiti. If you see any, send to graffiti@vahi.org. Include a picture if possible. Dept of Corrections crews work on those under the supervision of an APD officer. These crews can remove debris as well, such as sometimes appears on Maiden Lane.

3. Event impact. To let neighbors know when events are coming up that affect traffic and parking, the vahi.org calendar at the bottom right of the home page has been expanded to include many different events that could affect traffic. You might even want to participate, knowing an event is going on. In addition, the VHCA safety committee is working to make sure traffic and parking guidelines are enforced during events.

4. Homeowner cameras. Email safety@vahi.org to let them know you have a camera. The Safety Committee can then include these on a registry that police can use.

5. When to call 911 and when to call 311. For any crime, call 911. 311 is very effective for things about which you don’t need immediate police action, such as potholes, leaks in street, street services. You can get a ticket number and their follow-up seems to be good.

About the Police Foundation

Our meeting was attended both by APD and Police Foundation representatives. The Atlanta Police Foundation supports police. It’s a private-public relationship, like the Piedmont Park Conservancy and City of Atlanta- owned Piedmont Park. The Police Foundation runs the Video Integration Center described above, among other initiatives like the Crime Stoppers Program. One of its initiatives is to evaluate police cameras before they are purchased, and help determine how they are used.

Thank You

Our thanks to Michael Faughnan, Sgt. Julio Reyes, and Officers Mercado and Evans of the  Atlanta Police Department, and to Marlon Trone, VP of Programs for the Atlanta Police Foundation, who helped make the meeting a success.

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VHCA Unanimously Votes to Support the Monroe Road Diet

Renew Atlanta extends deadline for comments to March 29.

On Monday, March 14th, the VCHA Board unanimously voted to support the Monroe Road Diet and to submit a letter to Renew Atlanta and City Council in support of the Road Diet.

Meanwhile, Renew Atlanta has extended to March 29 the deadline to submit comments on the plan. The deadline was originally March 15. Comments can be submitted two ways: at www.RenewAtlantaBond.com or by emailing RenewAtlanta@AtlantaGa.gov.

During the Board discussion ahead of the vote, VHCA President Jenifer Keenan issued the following statement in support of the Monroe Road Diet:

The safety of citizens who live on and use Monroe has been a primary concern of the VHCA and the City of Atlanta over the last five years.  The high number of traffic wrecks, including two fatalities in less than a year, have made the conditions along this road a major neighborhood focus.  

The Connect Atlanta Plan and the BeltLine Subarea 6 Plan both supported a road diet for Monroe.  The consultants who examined traffic data for the Virginia-Highland’s Master Plan recommended a Complete Streets approach to Monroe that also included (among other features) a road diet. All these plans were formally adopted by the Atlanta City Council.

Renew Atlanta’s recently completed study proposes the same idea and estimates a 29% reduction in car accidents with a road diet and a much safer set of conditions for vehicles and other users.  Furthermore, the traffic circle at Park and Monroe, which is only feasible if there is a Road Diet, will result in a 60% reduction of injuries at that intersection. The road diet comes with a cost, though – significantly higher PM peak travel times for drivers on Monroe between the freeway and Yorkshire Drive.

It would be nice if we had a Monroe Drive that behaves like it did when the number of cars was far smaller.  But that’s not an option – those days are not coming back.  While the road’s traffic count dropped by 20% in the recession of the mid-2000’s (and may be somewhat variable in the future), the dangerous conditions on Monroe are constant.  We can’t eliminate traffic on Monroe, but we can certainly make the road safer.  

With or without a road diet, some levels of growth are likely.  But the road diet offers a far safer Monroe, one that is slower and safer for drivers, pedestrians, Grady students, BeltLine users and cyclists – and far more compatible with its residential character.

The Road Diet is the best way to improve safety on Monroe. Its design will reduce speed and left-turn blind spots 24 hours a day regardless of volume, and it will promote and safeguard the viability of single-family homes along Monroe.  We all regret the delays, but the safety of all the users of Monroe trumps the convenience of slower trips and should be the top priority for the City.  

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San Francisco Roasting Company Hosts Coffee with a Cop

On Wednesday, March 8th, residents were treated to lively discussion with representatives from the Atlanta Police Department. Deputy Chief Tim Quiller, Community Services Division Commander and Major Marisha Shepherd, Community Oriented Policing Section Commander, were joined by Majors Timothy Peek and James Shaw who command Zone 6 and Zone 2 respectively. Also represented were the Video Integration Center, Special Operations, 911 call center and other units. We even spoke with a few officers from Dekalb County PD.

Special thanks to San Francisco Coffee Roasting for graciously hosting the event and for being such a great part of our community.

Residents from all over Zone 2 and Zone 6 chatted about public safety concerns, and showed the men and women of law enforcement some appreciation. City Council District 6 Representative, Alex Wan was on hand to advocate on the behalf of neighborhoods for more video cameras and other tools and services that contribute to our safety.

 

 

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